Description

Ancient and cosmopolitan Malaga in the past still retains its historic roots intact. In long-gone times it bore witness to the origins of man and of the Mediterranean culture, and is today the primary force in the Andalusian tourist industry, keeping alive its tradition of a welcoming and creative land.

Maritime Malaga on the coast where winter never comes; and with a mountain vocation inland, where nature is displayed in all its splendour. White villages with their attractive architecture, wrapped in romantic legend, bring points of light into secluded valleys where life goes by peacefully. And from the peaks of the mountains you can watch the horizon until it becomes lost in the immense blue of the sea.

Location

The province of Malaga is located in the south of the Mediterranean coast, between the provinces of Granada and Cadiz, and bordering the provinces of Cordoba and Seville in the north.

The capital city is Málaga.

History

The history of this province has taken place between the sea and the mountains. Its capital was a witness to the economic and cultural boom of the western Mediterranean. The town known as Malaka by the Phoenicians was transformed into a prosperous commercial centre. After the Muslim invasion of the 8th century, the territory became Arabised and later became part of the Nasrid kingdom in Granada, when it underwent a new period of commercial and cultural prominence.

In the 19th century, the iron and steel industries of los Larios and the commercialisation of its wines provided significant economic development for the province.

After decades of economic downturn, Malaga underwent rapid economic growth in the second half of the 20th century, thanks to the tourist industry. Each year millions of citizens from all over the world choose this idyllic land to relax on its sun-drenched beaches, discover its rich architectural heritage or explore the wild beauty of its mountain geography.

Landscape

The province of Málaga has over 160 kilometres of coastline. A total of 14 districts are located directly on the Mediterranean Sea. You can find secluded enclaves set in unspoilt nature, as well as more established tourist resorts. The beaches in both the eastern and the western part of the province are so attractive they have made the Costa del Sol one of the top international destinations.

Also a must is the landscape inland, with more than 15 officially protected areas classified as nature reserves, natural spaces or natural landmarks. Places that may be either in the depths of the Mediterranean or on the highest peaks. Magical forests and rivers where you can still find foxes, golden eagles and Spanish ibex.

Gastronomy

Visitors will find endless gastronomic delights on the coast of Malaga. Small fish (anchovies, red mullet, mackerel, squid and baby squid) served fried are the hallmark dish in a cuisine which is characterised by its simple presentation and its exquisite tastes. The prawns from the bay, the clams and the boiled or grilled Dublin Bay prawns all have a special flavour.

In the interior of the province you will find delicious cured meats and hearty fare: kid with garlic, fried kid, hare... There are countless recipes for gazpacho in Malaga: ajoblanco (with garlic and almonds), porra antequerana, gazpachuelo (with fish)... The locally-produced wines, made from raisins and muscatel grapes, and the Pedro Ximénez sweet wine are internationally renowned.

A whole universe of flavours to be enjoyed by visitors to this ancient land.